Sujet inédit, séries technologiques, LV2

Énoncé

Document A
« At five o'clock on Tuesday afternoon, Zach Willet drove to the neighboring town of Madison and parked in front of the sales office of the Cartwright Town Houses Corporation. He went inside, where he found a sales clerk, a woman in her thirties, tidying up in preparation for closing down for the day. He noted the nameplate on her desk: AMY STACK.
"Hi, Amy", Zach said as he looked around the room. "I can see you're getting ready to skedaddle(1) out of here, so I won't take but two minutes of your time."
On the walls were sketches of different models of the town houses, and the artist's conception of how they might look when furnished. Zach walked from one to the other, examining them closely. He walked over to the biggest picture, and pointed to it. "Now, Amy, I know you're probably rushing to meet your husband or your boyfriend, but how about indulging a nice fellow like me and show me that fancy homestead."
"I'll be glad to take you over, Mr…." Amy hesitated. "I don't think you introduced yourself."
"That's right. I didn't. I'm Zach Willet, and unless you borrowed somebody else's nameplate you're Amy Stack."
"You've got it." Amy opened the top drawer of her desk and fished inside for her key ring.
"That's 8, Pawnee Avenue. I have to warn you that is our top-of-the-line town house. It's fully loaded with every conceivable extra, and naturally that is reflected in the cost. It's also the furnished model."
"Sounds better and better" Zach said genially. "Let's take a look at it."
On the way through the development(2), Amy Stack pointed out that the landscaping was almost finished, and that the driveways were heated to prevent ice from forming in the winter. "Mr. Cartwright has thought of everything", she said proudly. "He's one of those hands-on builders who is involved in every detail, every step of the way."
"Ted's a good friend of mine," Zach said expansively. "Has been for forty years, since we were both kids riding bareback at the stable." He looked around. "Expensive cars in the driveways," he commented. "Nice class of neighbors. I can see that."
"Absolutely," Amy assured him. "The nicest people you'd ever want to meet." She walked a few steps more, then said, "Here we are at number 8. As you can see, it's a corner unit, and it really is the crown jewel of the development."
Zach's smile broadened as Amy turned the key, opened the door, and led him into the family room on the entry level. "Some people use the room on the other side for a gym, and, of course, there's a full bath with a hot tub right beside it. It's such a convenient arrangement".
Amy said, her voice crackling with professional enthusiasm.
"Two guest bedrooms," he joked. "I don't have close family, but with those two bedrooms, I'd better look up those cousins of mine in Ohio and have them out for a weekend."
They rode back down in the elevator, went outside, and, as Amy locked the front door, Zach said, "I'll take it. As is. Furnished."
"That's wonderful," Amy Stack exclaimed. "Are you prepared to make a deposit now?"
"Didn't Ted Cartwright tell you that he's giving me this unit?" Zach asked, his tone astonished. "I saved his life once, and now that I have to get out of where I've been living, he told me to come over and choose my space. Ted never forgets a favor. You must be proud to be in his employ." »
Adapted from Mary Higgins Clark, No Place Like Home, 2005

Document B
« After the engagement(3),' Pranab Kaku and Deborah began drifting out of our lives. They moved in together, to an apartment in Boston, in the South End, a part of the city my parents considered unsafe. A few weeks before the wedding, my parents invited Pranab Kaku to the house alone, and my mother prepared a special meal to mark the end of his bachelorhood. It would be the only Bengali aspect of the wedding; the rest of it would be strictly American, with a cake and minister(4) and Deborah in a long white dress and veil. "She will leave him", my mother told her friends afterward. "He is throwing his life away." The wedding was at a church in Ipswich, with a reception at a country club. Though we were the closest thing Pranab Kaku had to a family that day, we were not included in the group photographs that were taken on the grounds of the country club. »
Jhumpa Lahiri, Hell-Heaven, 2004

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 
a) Give the full names of the characters who are present.
b) Give the full name of one of the characters mentioned.
2 When exactly does the scene take place? (10 words maximum)
3 
a) Focus on the passage from the start down to "Let's take a look at it." Where exactly are the characters? (10 words max.)
b) Focus on the passage from "Zach's smile broadened" down to "for a weekend". Where are they? (10 words max.)
c) How do they go from one place to another?
d) Justify your answer in 3. c) by quoting from the text.
e) What do they go to the second place for? (10 words max.)
f) Characterize the second place with four adjectives of your own.
4 Focus on the female character.
a) Give her boss's full name. What is her job? What does it consist in? (30 words max.)
b) What is she about to do at the beginning of the text? (10 words max.)
c) What does she do instead? (10 words max.)
d) What does it reveal about her? (5 to 10 words max.)
e) Quote one element from the text to support your answer in 4. d)
f) Focus on the passage from "Absolutely" down to "Furnished". Choose the adjective that best applies to her. She is: sensitive - surprised - convincing - rude - indifferent
g) Justify your answer in 4. f) by quoting two elements from the passage.
5  Focus on the male character.
Read the passage from the start down to "you're Amy Stack".
a) Choose the adjective that best corresponds to his attitude.
He is: well-mannered - shy - distant - over familiar
b) Justify your answer in 5. a) with a quotation from the passage.
6  Focus on the passage from "That's wonderful" down to the end.
a) "I'll take it.". What does the pronoun "it" refer to?
b) "I'll take it.". What does "take" mean for the female character ?
c) Justify your answer in 6. b) by quoting one element from the text.
d) "I'll take it.". What does "take" mean for the male character?
e) Justify your answer in 6. d) by quoting from the text.
Questions on document B
7 In which country does the story take place? Justify with a quote from the text.
8 
a) Which two characters are not members of the narrator's family?
b) What major event in their lives is going to take place?
9 
a) Say where Pranab Kaku is invited before this major event and on what special occasion.
b) What is the ethnic background of the people present?
10 What is Deborah's ethnic background? Read the whole text and find one element to justify your answer.
11 The narrator's mother's feelings towards Pranab Kaku are contradictory. Explain.
12 Say whether the following statement is true or false. Justify with a quotation from the text. − At one point the narrator feels that her family is excluded.
Question on documents A and B
13 Do these two documents present a similar vision of 'space and exchanges'? Explain.
II. Expression écrite
1 The next morning, the female character meets her boss at the office. Write their conversation. (200 words)
2 How important is friendship in life? Illustrate your point of view with examples. (200 words)
(1) to skedaddle: run away hurriedly.
(2) Development: housing development.
(3) Engagement: a formal agreement to get married.
(4) Minister: a member of the clergy.

Le sujet pas à pas

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande :
a) de donner les noms entiers des personnages présents
b) de donner le nom entier d'un des personnages mentionnés.
Procéder par étapes
  1. Repérez tous les noms propres et identifiez ceux qui correspondent à des noms de personnages.
  2. Analysez si le personnage dont il s'agit chaque fois est présent ou seulement mentionné.
  3. Rédigez votre réponse clairement.
2 
Comprendre la question
Vous devez préciser à quel moment (jour et heure) la scène se déroule.
3 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit d'/de :
a) indiquer précisément où se trouvent les personnages dans ce premier passage.
b) indiquer précisément où se trouvent les personnages dans cette partie du document.
c) expliquer comment ils se déplacent d'un lieu à un autre.
d) justifier votre réponse en c) en citant le texte.
e) expliquer la raison de leur déplacement au deuxième lieu.
f) citer le texte pour montrer le caractère unique de ce deuxième lieu.
Procéder par étapes
  1. Identifier la partie du texte qui correspond à chaque sous-question.
  2. Analyser cette partie au moyen d'une lecture fine afin de pouvoir repérer la réponse à la question.
Focus on the female character
4 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande de/d' :
a) donner le nom du patron du personnage féminin en entier, d'indiquer son métier et d'expliquer en quoi celui-ci consiste.
b) expliquer ce qu'elle est sur le point de faire au début du texte.
c) indiquer ce qu'elle fait au lieu de cela.
d) analyser ce que son action nous révèle.
e) citer un élément du texte pour justifier votre réponse en d).
f) choisir l'adjectif qui la décrit le mieux pour la partie du texte précisée. Est-elle : sensible - surprise - convaincante - impolie ou indifférente ?
g) citer deux éléments du texte pour justifier votre réponse en f).
Focus on the male character
5 
Comprendre la question
Vous devez vous intéresser au personnage masculin et la partie du texte indiqué.
a) Il s agit de choisir l'adjectif qui correspond le mieux à son attitude : bien élevé - timide - distant ou trop familier.
b) On vous demande de justifier la réponse donnée en a) en citant le passage.
Focus on the passage from "That's wonderful" down to the end.
6 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de :
a) dire à quoi correspond « it » dans « I'll take it. »
b) dire ce que le personnage féminin comprend par « take » dans « I'll take it. »
c) justifier la réponse donnée en b) en citant le texte.
d) dire ce que le personnage masculin comprend par « take » dans « I'll take it. »
e) justifier la réponse donnée en b) en citant le texte.
Questions on document B
7 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de dire où se passe l'histoire en citant le texte pour justifier votre réponse.
8 
Comprendre la question
Vous devez expliquer :
a) quels sont les deux personnages qui ne sont pas membres de la famille du narrateur.
b) quel événement majeur par rapport à leurs vies est sur le point de se produire.
9 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande de :
a) dire ou Pranab Kaku est invité avant cet événement et à quelle occasion.
b) expliciter l'origine ethnique des personnes présentes à cette occasion.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
childhood = the state of being a child.
motherhood = the state of being a mother.
bachelorhood = the state of being a bachelor.
10 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit d'expliciter l'origine ethnique de Deborah, et de citer un élément du texte pour justifier votre réponse.
11 
Comprendre la question
Vous devez expliquer les sentiments contradictoires de la mère du narrateur vis-à-vis de Pranab Kaku. (Cela veut dire qu'elle est à la fois gentille et hostile.)
'At one point the narrator feels that her family is excluded.'
12 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande de dire si l'affirmation ci-dessus est vraie ou fausse en justifiant avec une citation du texte.
Question on documents A and B
14 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit d'expliquer si la vision de l'espace et des échanges présentée dans ces deux documents est similaire ou non. (Cela veut dire qu'il faut vous demander si chaque fois la vision est positive ou négative, puis expliquer pourquoi.)
II. Expression écrite
1 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de rédiger une conversation entre Amy Stack et son patron Ted Cartwright (à qui elle raconte sa rencontre avec Zach). Deux options possibles :
a) Ted confirme sa dette envers Zach et raconte comment celui-ci lui a sauvé la vie.
b) Ted nie tout lien avec Zach et est furieux après Amy qui lui a laissé prendre possession de leur meilleur logement gratuitement.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Une conversation nécessite l'utilisation de l'anglais oral :
Formes contractées (it's/don't… )
Impératif (tell me…/don't worry)
Formules idiomatiques :
  • What's up?/ What's the matter?/ What's wrong?
  • Are you okay?/ Are you alright?/ Is everything okay?
  • It's not good  + V-ing/ It's no use  + V-ing
Chaque personnage joue un rôle précis dans la conversation :
Pour Amy, elle espère que Ted confirmera qu'elle a bien fait :
  • I hope (that)…/ Please tell me that
Pour Ted, ou bien il la rassure et explique leur histoire :
  • I owe Zach/ Zach saved my life
  • It was a long time ago/ When we were kids…
  • This is what happened/ I'll tell you what happened.
Ou bien il exprime sa colère et son imbécilité :
  • I don't believe it/ You did WHAT?/ Are you out of your mind?
  • How stupid can you get… / You are so naive, it's just not true
Procéder par étapes
  1. Réfléchissez aux grandes lignes de la conversation.
  2. Rédigez la conversation au brouillon.
  3. Contrôlez la précision linguistique de votre brouillon (grammaire, lexique) puis recopiez-le au propre.
2 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de prendre position par rapport à l'importance de l'amitié dans la vie et d'exprimer son propre point de vue. L'amitié est-elle importante? Si « oui », y a-t-il des limites ? Si « non », pourquoi ? Quelle que soit la position que vous adoptiez, il s'agit d'un essai argumentatif. Ce qui importe le plus, c'est que vous démontriez votre capacité à argumenter. Vous pouvez fort bien présenter les deux faces du même argument et annoncer votre position personnelle dans la conclusion.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Pour un essai argumentatif, il faut mobiliser :
Les expressions d'opinion :
  • to my mind/ in my opinion/ from my point of view/ as far as I'm concerned)
Les mots de liaison pour articuler votre discours :
  • en renforcement : indeed/ moreover/ what's more
  • pour marquer une opposition : however/ and yet
Pour parler de l'amitié, il vous faudra parler de :
  • activités : have fun, chat, exchange ideas, support, listen to, talk, confide in
  • valeurs : have things in common/ share interests, ideals, tastes, values
  • caractéristiques : understanding, spontaneous, carefree, tolerant
  • points négatifs : bad quarrels/ rejection
Procéder par étapes
  • Préparez vos idées : des arguments pour et contre.
  • Rédigez votre réponse en respectant la structure d'un essai argumentatif :
  1. introduction (reformulation du sujet)
  2. 1er paragraphe = « thèse » (Exemple : l'amitié est importante parce que…)
  3. 2e paragraphe = « antithèse » (Exemple : elle n'est pas vraiment importante parce que…)
  4. conclusion (rappel du sujet et votre avis personnel circonstancié)
  • Contrôlez la qualité de votre anglais.

Corrigé

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 
a) The characters who are present are Zach Willet and Amy Stack.
b) The character mentioned is Ted Cartwright.
2 The scene takes place at five o'clock on a Tuesday afternoon.
3 
a) The characters are in the sales office of the Cartwright Town houses Corporation.
b) The characters are in a house situated at number 8, Pawnee Avenue, Madison, located in a housing development.
c) They go from one place to another on foot./ They walk from one place to another.
d) "She walked a few steps more"…
e) They go to the second place to visit a house in the housing development.
f) It really is the crown jewel of the development.
4 
a) Her boss's full name is Ted Cartwright. She is a sales clerk who makes people visit the new houses in the housing development. Her job consists in selling the houses.
b) She is about to leave because it is closing time.
c) She takes the keys of one of the houses to show it to Zach Willet.
d) She is deeply involved in her job and doesn't mind working overtime.
e) - "Amy opened the top drawer of her desk and fished inside for her key ring."
-"…her voice crackling with professional enthusiasm."
"Are you prepared to make a deposit now?"
f) She is convincing.
g) - "Absolutely, Amy assured him.".
-"[…] it is really the crown jewel of the development."
-"[…] her voice crackling with professional enthusiasm.
5 
a) He is over familiar.
b) "Hi, Amy."
- "Now, Amy, I know you're probably rushing to meet your husband or your boyfriend, but how about indulging a nice fellow like me and show me that fancy homestead?"
6 
a) The pronoun "it" refers to the house.
b) For the female character "take" means to buy the house.
c) "Are you prepared to make a deposit now?
d) For the male character, "take" means he has just chosen the present Ted Cartwright has promised to give him.
e) - "Didn't Ted Cartwright tell you that he's giving me this unit?"
-"… he told me to come over and choose my space.
Questions on document B
7 The story takes place in the USA: "Boston".
8 
a) Pranab Kaku and Deborah are not a member of the family.
b) They are going to get married.
9 
a) He is invited to Usha's parents for dinner for the end of his bachelorhood.
b) The people present are of Bengali origin.
10 Deborah is American. "the rest of it would be strictly American"
11 She is kind with Pranab Kaku, as she prepares a special meal for him. At the same time, she also disapproves of his marriage with an American.
12 True: "we were not included in the group photographs."
Question on documents A and B
13 These two documents present a contrasting vision of 'space and exchanges'. Indeed, in document A Ted Cartwright is ready to pay for luxury accommodation for his old friend Zach Willet to express his gratitude for saving his life. The mood is one of generosity and open-mindedness. On the contrary, in document B, the mood centres on distrust and intolerance, as the narrator's Bengali family is hostile to Pranab Kaku's marriage with an American girl.
II. Expression écrite
1 Ted C.: Morning, Amy! Did everything go alright, yesterday?
Amy S.: Morning, boss! Yes, it was a good day. Pretty busy!
Ted C.: Did you make any sales, then?
Amy S.: Well, you'll be pleased to know that N° 8 Pawnee Street, our crown jewel, is already occupied!
Ted C.: Amy − that's amazing! I'm away from the office a day and you make the best sale ever! If I don't watch out, you'll be taking my job next!
Amy S.: Well, I don't know about that. It's a bit more complicated than that, and I'm not even sure I've done the right thing.
Ted C.: Why? Didn't the buyer pay a deposit before you gave him the key?
Amy S.: No, he didn't and he had a very convincing argument.
Ted C.: Amy, I don't like the sound of this. You know, I've always told you never to hand over the keys before the client pays…
Amy S.: I know, but this guy − his name's Zach Willet − said that he was a good friend of yours, and that he had saved your life in the past, and that you'd invited him to choose the house of his choice and move in!
Ted C.: And you believed him! Zach Willet, you say? I've never heard of him and no one's ever had to save my life. Amy, you've been had by a con man. Get the police on the line for me, right now!
Amy S.: Oh no! What have I done now! I should have known! I'm so sorry…
2 Friends generally have a lot of fun together since relationships with friends are spontaneous and carefree. They chat for hours about serious or dramatic subjects. Friendship has generally developed between people who know each other very well, have things in common, share the same interests, ideals, tastes, activities and values. They often confront opinions and ideas. It can help solve problems and teach tolerance.
All this goes to show that when you have a problem you often ask friends for support more easily than to your parents. Parents are not always able to listen to their children's problems, to talk about them, to help find a solution although they have come of age, are adults and have a certain experience of life. They are not always understanding and very often they judge and may also be biased. This might lead to bad quarrels and maybe to rejection. This is often due to the generation gap whereas when you talk about your problems with friends, they are much more understanding.
Furthermore friends, unlike parents, don't tend to judge you because you belong to the same generation and even though you are very close the problem won't affect them as it will affect your family.
That is why friendship is very important in life as you share things which are different from the ones you share with your parents and you can confide in friends.