Sujet inédit, séries technologiques, LV1

Énoncé

Document A
« Once I was invited to a wedding; the bride suggested I drive up from New York with a pair of other guests, a Mr. and Mrs. Roberts, whom I had never met before. It was a cold April day, and on the ride to Connecticut, the Robertses, a couple in their early forties, seemed agreeable enough − no one you would want to spend a long weekend with, but not bad. However, at the wedding reception a great deal of liquor was consumed, I should say a third of it by my chauffeurs. They were the last to leave the party − at approximately 11 P.M. − and I was most wary of accompanying them; I knew they were drunk, but I didn't realize how drunk. We had driven about twenty miles, the car weaving considerably, and Mr. and Mrs. Roberts insulting each other in the most extraordinary language, when Mr. Roberts, very understandably, made a wrong turn and got lost on a dark country road. I kept asking them, finally begging them, to stop the car and let me out, but they were so involved in their invectives that they ignored me. Eventually the car stopped of its own accord (temporarily) when it swiped against the side of a tree. I used the opportunity to jump out the car's back door and run into the woods. Presently the cursed vehicle drove off, leaving me alone in the icy dark. I'm sure my hosts never missed me; Lord knows I didn't miss them.
But it wasn't a joy to be stranded out there on a windy cold night. I started walking, hoping I'd reach a highway. I walked for half an hour without sighting a habitation. Then, just off the road, I saw a small cottage with a porch and a window lighted by a lamp. I tiptoed onto the porch and looked in the window; an elderly woman with soft white hair and a round pleasant face was sitting by a fireside reading a book. There was a cat curled in her lap, and several others slumbering at her feet.
I knocked at the door, and when she opened it I said, with chattering teeth: "I am sorry to disturb you, but I've had a sort of accident; I wonder if I could use your phone to call a taxi."
"Oh, dear," she said, smiling, "I'm afraid I don't have a phone. Too poor. But please, come in." And as I stepped through the door into the cosy room, she said: "My goodness, boy. You're freezing. Can I make coffee? A cup of tea? I have a little whiskey my husband left − he died six years ago."
I said a little whiskey would be very welcome. »
Truman Capote, Music for Chameleons, 1975

Document B
« "Is this seat taken?" It was a woman; no, a girl. "Not as far as I know," I said.
She sat upright, looking out of the window. I picked my newspaper, but as I did so my glance swept across my neighbour opposite, and was arrested for a moment.
Although it was eleven o'clock in the morning, she was wearing a long dark green dress made of velvet like that worn at a formal dinner party, but not at eleven in the morning on a train. She was dark-haired, with a heart-shaped face and large dark brown eyes, so dark as to be almost black. Two ruby earrings glinted under the dark helmet of her hair. What caught my eye, however, was her gaze. There was something familiar about her. With some difficulty, I turned my eyes away from her and looked at the view. I was not in the mood for talking to a stranger, no matter how attractive. Then, involuntarily, I glanced at her again and saw that she was looking straight at me. Why was she dressed in such old-fashioned clothes? I turned back to my Sudoku puzzle, but she was aware of my glance.
"Why were you staring at me?" she asked.
I looked up in surprise and mumbled: "I thought we might have met before somewhere − but I'm afraid I have a terrible memory."
I blushed. It sounded as if I was trying to pick her up, which was the last thing on my mind.
"You will remember me if we meet again, I'm sure."
I could think of no reply to this and did not want to be drawn into conversation. There was something about the girl's tone of voice that hinted at instability. Her dress alone was deeply eccentric. There was a silence as the train rattled through the Durham countryside. The girl spoke again.
"As a matter of fact, you have seen me before − but I'm not surprised that you can't remember where."
"I'm sorry?"
She gazed at me, her brown eyes looking directly into mine so that I found it hard to look away.
"Can you not picture where you first caught sight of me? But perhaps you would not believe it if you could."
I wondered again whether she was mentally deranged and decided to change my seat. Perhaps I could say I was going to get a cup of coffee, and then find a place in another carriage. I hated personal revelations from complete strangers; I didn't much appreciate them from anyone, come to that.
I couldn't think of anything to say and decided I would go and sit somewhere else. But she
anticipated me and said, "Don't go, we've only begun to talk."
"I wasn't going anywhere," I lied, relaxing back into my seat. I was stuck with this mad woman now. How excruciating!
"Don't you like talking to strangers?" asked the girl. "You should, you know. You can say anything you want. Mostly you'll never see them again, so it simply doesn't matter. That's the whole point of journeys: the strangers you meet, the lies you tell them." »
Paul Torday, The Girl on the Landing, 2009

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 Complete the following sum-up with words taken from the text (one blank is one world).
The narrator left a reception with a couple in their ............ (1) ............ (2) who had had too much ............ (3) to drink. He was afraid of being in the car with them and the man was ............ (4) his wife. The narrator managed to ............ (5) ............ (6) of the vehicle and ran through the woods to a house. He wanted to ............ (7) but he couldn't. He was happy to have a ............ (8).
2 Right or Wrong? Answer and justify by quoting the text.
a) The narrator knew the Robertses very well.
b) The narrator went to the wedding in the winter.
c) On the way home the narrator was determined to leave the car.
d) The narrator supposes his disappearance was not noticed.
e) He saw the house immediately after leaving the car.
3 Write down:
a) one element which indicates that the Robertses couldn't find their way home.
b) two elements which indicate that the weather was bad.
c) two elements which indicate that the lady looked welcoming.
d) one element which indicates the lady had money problems.
e) a sentence which indicates that the lady used to be married.
4 Who or what do the following pronouns or possessive adjectives refer to?
a) "we"
b) "its"
c) "them"
d) "my"
5 Find synonyms in the text for the following words:
  • imploring;
  • insults;
  • finally;
  • on one's own;
  • old.
6 What do the following expressions mean? Write down the answer.
a) "…I was most wary of accompanying them…"
  • Réponse 1 : He was very happy.
  • Réponse 2 : He was very anxious.
  • Réponse 3 : He was indifferent.
b) "…I didn't miss them."
  • Réponse 1 : He was happy to see them go.
  • Réponse 2 : He was worried to see them go.
  • Réponse 3 : He was sorry to see them go.
Questions on document B
7 What kind of document is this?
8 Situate the narrator and the girl precisely, why is the place important for the suspense? (30-40 words)
9 What part do the girl's clothes play in the story? (20-30 words)
10 Pick out and write down:
a) two phrases showing that the narrator couldn't take his eyes off the girl.
b) two phrases showing that the narrator wondered if he had not seen the girl before.
c) two phrases showing that the narrator wanted to go away.
d) two phrases showing that the narrator feared the girl might be crazy.
11 Pick out the sentence showing that the girl can guess what the narrator is going to do.
12 Here is a list of adjectives:
perplexed - comical - insistent - furious - ill at ease - talkative.
From the list, pick out and write down.
a) 2 adjectives that describe the girl.
b) 2 adjectives that describe the narrator.
Question on documents A and B
13 Indicate two similarities and two differences in the main character's situation in the two documents.
II. Expression écrite
Vous devez traiter les deux sujets suivants.
1 What happens next? Write the next part of the story for document A. (120 words)
2 The girl in document B finally reveals her identity. Imagine the conversation. (120 words)

Le sujet pas à pas

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 
Vous devez compléter le résumé à l'aide de mots prélevés dans le texte : chaque blanc correspond à un mot.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
1. + 2. couple in their ...... ......  : les éléments qui manquent sont en lien avec leur âge. In their forties = qui avaient la quarantaine; in their early forties = au début de la quarantaine; in their late forties = à la fin de la quarantaine.
3. had too much ...... to drink: il s'agit de ce qu'ils ont bu (drink).
4. the man was ...... his wife: l'élément qui manque est un verbe en -ing qui décrit l'attitude de l'homme envers sa femme.
5. managed to ......: il s'agit d'un verbe pour indiquer ce que le narrateur réussit (manage to) à faire.
6. ...... of the vehicle: vous devez rechercher la préposition qui indique son mouvement "en dehors" du véhicule.
7. wanted to ......: il s'agit d'un verbe pour indiquer ce que le narrateur voulait faire.
8. happy to have a ......: l'élément manquant est un objet que le narrateur se contentait d'avoir.
Procéder par étapes
  1. Il faut repérer la partie de l'extrait qui correspond à chaque phrase du résumé.
  2. Ensuite, vous devez identifier l'élément manquant.
2 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de dire pour chaque affirmation si elle est vraie ou fausse et de justifier en citant une courte phrase du texte.
a) Le narrateur connaissait très bien le couple Roberts.
b) Le mariage auquel se rendit le narrateur avait lieu en hiver.
c) Sur le trajet de retour, le narrateur voulait à tout prix quitter la voiture.
d) Le narrateur suppose que sa disparition est passée inaperçue.
e) Il aperçut la maison aussitôt après être descendu de la voiture.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Vous aurez besoin de comprendre ces mots :
host  = hôte
miss  = manquer (tu me manques =  I miss you)
Procéder par étapes
  1. Il faut repérer la partie de l'extrait qui correspond à chaque affirmation.
  2. Ensuite, vous devez analyser si la phrase du texte a le même sens ou non que l'affirmation pour choisir "true" ou "false".
  3. Recopiez la phrase du texte à côté de votre réponse `true' ou `false'.
3 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande de trouver :
a) 1 élément qui montre que le couple Roberts ne trouvait pas le trajet pour rentrer chez eux.
b) 2 éléments qui montrent que le temps était mauvais.
c) 2 éléments qui montrent que la dame avait l'air accueillant.
d) 1 élément qui montre que la dame avait des difficultés financières.
e) 1 phrase qui indique que la dame était mariée autrefois.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
b) éléments qui peuvent relever du mauvais temps :
  • ice, fog, wind (= le temps)
  • wet, cold, freezing (= les personnes)
Procéder par étapes
  1. Il faut repérer la partie de l'extrait qui correspond à chaque question.
  2. Ensuite, vous devez repérer les éléments demandés.
4 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de dire à quoi renvoie chaque pronom ou adjectif possessif.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Pronoms personnels (ils désignent des personnes) : we, them (ici)
Adjectifs possessifs : its (désigne un objet), my
Procéder par étapes
  1. Il faut repérer chaque mot dans l'extrait.
  2. Ensuite, vous devez repérer l'élément dans le contexte immédiat qui y correspond.
5 
Comprendre la question
Vous devez trouver un synonyme dans le texte pour chaque élément listé. Ils sont présentés dans l'ordre du texte.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Les trois premiers mots sont transparents : vous pouvez comprendre leur sens.
  • imploring correspond à un verbe différent + -ing
  • insults pourrait être un verbe au présent ou bien un nom au pluriel, sauf que le récit est au passé ce qui élimine la première possibilité. Vous recherchez donc un nom au pluriel.
  • finally est un adverbe. Vous en cherchez un autre (qui se termine par -ly)
  • on one's own signifie `seul' : vous recherchez un adjectif.
  • old: vous connaissez le sens, et vous recherchez un autre adjectif qui veut dire la même chose.
6 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de deux questions à choix multiple. On vous donne une citation du texte, et vous devez choisir la réponse qui correspond le mieux au sens de la citation.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Lorsque vous ne comprenez pas bien le sens d'un mot clé dans la citation ('wary' en a)), il convient de regarder le contexte immédiat dans le document pour voir quelle est la solution la plus logique. Après la citation a), le narrateur parle de l'ivresse ('drunk') de ses chauffeurs : quelle est la réponse qui convient le mieux ?
Questions on document B
7 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande d'identifier la nature du document.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Un document peut être :
  • un article de presse : informations brutes présentées en paragraphes courts + source journalistique + date de publication généralement récente.
  • un extrait de roman : nom d'auteur + titre de l'œuvre + date de publication à la fin de l'extrait. Texte descriptif ou bien un dialogue commenté.
Procéder par étapes
  1. Regardez la source du document. Correspond-il davantage à un article de presse ou à un extrait de roman ?
  2. Regardez le type de contenu pour confirmer votre impression.
  3. Rédigez votre réponse en explicitant les éléments de la source pour justifier.
8 
Comprendre la question
Vous devez situer l'action précisément et expliquer pourquoi ce lieu convient particulièrement à créer du suspense.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
En général, il y a du suspense quand le personnage ne peut échapper à un danger imminent. Dans ce texte, pourquoi a-t-il du mal à s'échapper ? Et quel est le danger ?
9 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande d'expliquer le rôle de la tenue vestimentaire de la fille dans l'histoire.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Il vous faudra repérer les endroits où l'on parle de sa tenue. Ces expressions figurent peut-être dans le texte :
  • clothes, dress, costume, outfit
  • wearing, dressed in
Procéder par étapes
  1. Repérer les passages où l'on parle de sa tenue.
  2. Analyser comment on la décrit : de manière positive ou négative ? Quelle impression donne-t-elle ?
  3. Dans votre réponse, expliquez d'abord comme elle est habillée et ensuite ce que cela suggère.
10 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de repérer chaque fois deux citations qui montrent que :
a) le narrateur n'arrêtait pas de regarder la fille, malgré lui.
b) il se demandait s'il ne l'avait pas vue auparavant.
c) il voulait s'en aller.
d) il craignait qu'elle ne soit folle.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Pour le regard :
  • look/ stare/ glance at  : on dirige son regard vers quelque chose ou quelqu'un.
  • look/ glance/ turn away  : on détourne son regard.
Pour changer de place dans le train :
  • change places/ seats
  • sit elsewhere/ somewhere else
Le lexique de la folie :
  • mad, insane, mentally ill, crazy, unstable, disturbed
11 
Comprendre la question
Vous devez trouver la phrase qui montre que la fille devine ce que le narrateur a l'intention de faire.
12 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de choisir dans la liste :
a) deux adjectifs pour décrire la fille.
b) deux adjectifs pour décrire le narrateur.
Question on documents A and B
13 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande d'indiquer deux similitudes et deux différences dans la situation dans laquelle se trouve le personnage central des deux documents.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Vous aurez besoin d'exprimer la notion de :
Piège :
  • in a trap/ trapped
  • want to escape/ get away
Dérangement, trouble :
  • (to) disturb, trouble, perturb, frighten, scare
  • disturbing, frightening, scary, disconcerting
Procéder par étapes
  1. Pensez à l'identité du personnage central, puis à la situation dans laquelle il se trouve.
  2. Identifiez deux points communs et deux différences entre les deux supports.
  3. Rédigez votre réponse en anglais.
II. Expression écrite
1 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de rédiger la suite de l'histoire concernant la rencontre entre le protagoniste et la vieille dame dans le document A. (Comme il accepte le whisky qu'elle lui offre, on peut supposer qu'il va passer la nuit chez elle. Le dénouement sera-t-il heureux ou non ?)
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Pour continuer le récit, il faut respecter le temps de narration (le prétérit) et les éléments de l'histoire déjà fournis :
  • la vieille dame n'a pas le téléphone,
  • elle est accueillante,
  • elle est veuve depuis 6 ans,
  • la maison est coquette.
Pour raconter son séjour chez la vieille dame, vous avez peut-être besoin :
  • du lexique de la maison : bedroom, kitchen, bathroom, hall
  • du lexique de la nourriture : soup, bread and butter, toast, breakfast, bacon and eggs
  • du lexique pour parler de son mari, de sa profession : woodcutter, vet, beekeeper, librarian, schoolteacher …
  • la raison de sa mort : illness: cancer, heart attack  ; accident: car/ train accident, fishing/ shooting accident
Procéder par étapes
  1. Rédigez la suite directement au brouillon en réfléchissant en anglais.
  2. Ne cherchez pas à dire ce que vous ne savez pas dire en anglais.
  3. Relisez-vous. Essayez de limiter les répétitions et de relier les phrases.
  4. Recopiez votre récit au propre.
2 
Comprendre la question
Vous devez rédiger la conversation entre la fille et l'homme dans le document B. Au cours de cette conversation, la fille va révéler son identité et la raison pour laquelle elle se trouve dans le même wagon que l'homme.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Une conversation nécessite l'utilisation de l'anglais oral :
  • formes contractées (it's/ don't…)
  • impératif (tell me…/ don't be scared)
  • formules idiomatiques :
  • Who on earth are you?/ What the hell are you talking about?
  • Are you okay?
Chaque personnage joue un rôle précis dans la conversation :
  • pour l'homme, il aimerait bien quitter le wagon et ne plus voir la fille :I don't want to…/ Please let me + Verbe…
  • pour la fille, elle a une information importante à lui donner : You must listen to me/ what I have to say is very important…
Procéder par étapes
  1. Réfléchissez aux grandes lignes de la conversation. (Que va-t-elle dévoiler ?)
  2. Rédigez la conversation au brouillon en évitant d'exprimer des idées trop complexes pour vous en anglais.
  3. Contrôlez la précision linguistique de votre brouillon (grammaire, lexique) puis recopiez-le au propre.

Corrigé

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 The narrator left a reception with a couple in their early (1) forties (2) who had had too much liquor (3) to drink.
He was afraid of being in the car with them and the man was insulting (4) his wife.
The narrator managed to jump (5) out (6) of the vehicle and ran through the woods to a house.
He wanted to phone/ call (7) but he couldn't.
He was happy to have a whiskey (8).
2 
a) Wrong: "[…] whom I had never met before."
b) Wrong: "[…] a cold April day […]"
c) Right: "I kept asking them […] to stop the car and let me out […]"
d) Right: "I'm sure my hosts never missed me […]"
e) Wrong: "I walked for half an hour without sighting a habitation."
3 
a) "Mr. Roberts […] made a wrong turn and got lost […]"
b) "[…] icy dark."; "[…] windy cold night."; "You're freezing."
c) "[…] round pleasant face…"; "[…] smiling…"
d) "Too poor."
e) "[…] he died six years ago."
4 
a) "we" refers to the Robertses and the narrator.
b) "its" refers to the car.
c) "them" refers to the Robertses.
d) "my" refers to the elderly woman.
5 
  • imploring = "begging";
  • insults = "invectives";
  • finally = "eventually";
  • on one's own = "alone";
  • old = "elderly".
6 
a) Answer 2 : He was very anxious.
b) Answer 1 : He was happy to see them go.
Questions on document B
7 This document is an extract/ excerpt from a novel The girl on the landing written by Paul Torday in 2009.
8 The narrator and the girl are alone in the same train compartment, they are facing each other so that he can't help seeing her and it is easy for her to attract his attention. She takes advantage of the place which is very close so as to get round him: he can't escape her.
9 The girl acts as if she were a magician, she is good at attracting people's attention with her clothes and general appearance. He can even hardly say how old she is. Her clothes make him doubt about her identity.
10 
a) "With some difficulty, I turned my eyes away from her […]", "[…] involuntarily I glanced at her again", "[…] I found it hard to look away".
b) "There was something familiar about her", "I thought we might have met before somewhere […]".
c) "[…] and decided to change my seat", "Perhaps I could say I was going to get a cup of coffee, and then find a place in another carriage", "[…] decided I would go and sit somewhere else".
d) "There was something about the girl's tone of voice that hinted at instability",
"I wondered again whether she was mentally deranged […]",
"I was stuck with this mad woman […]".
11 "But she anticipated me"
(ici, il faut trouver la phrase qui nous dit que la jeune femme devine ou anticipe ce que va faire le narrateur).
12  Adjectives that describe the girl: insistent and talkative
(la jeune femme est bavarde alors qu'elle ne connaît pas le narrateur Elle insiste pour attirer son attention).
Adjectives that describe the narrator: perplexed and ill at ease
(le narrateur est mal à l'aise et cette rencontre le laisse dans le doute, il se demande s'il la connaît, puis si elle est folle).
Question on documents A and B
13 In both documents the main character is male.
He is trapped in a means of transport with people that he would like to escape from.
However, in document A he manages to escape, whereas in document B, we don't know how this episode ends.
In document A, the couple disturbs him because they are excessively drunk and dangerous, while in document B, the girl is disturbing because she seems rather crazy.
II. Expression écrite
1 The lady went to the kitchen and brought back a glass of whiskey. I sipped it and felt a little better since I had felt quite cold walking outside to reach her house.
We chatted for a while and she told me that her husband had died in a car accident. She felt lonely as the house was isolated and she was obviously pleased to have an unexpected visitor she could talk to. I told her how I happened to knock at her door. Outside it was dark and cold. She told me she couldn't do anything to help me since it was late and she suggested I stayed at her place for the night, which I most willingly accepted. She led me to a guest bedroom which was as cosy as the rest of the house. I went into bed and fell asleep very quickly for the day I had spent had been exhausting.
The following morning, I woke up and went to the sitting room where I heard noise coming from the kitchen. I went in and found the elderly woman preparing breakfast. We sat at the table and had breakfast together. After breakfast, we left the house on foot and she led me to a small hamlet where she had friends. She knocked at a door. We were greeted by an old lady who had a phone. I gave a call to a taxi and after thanking the two old ladies I got into the taxi and went back home.
2 (Il s'agit bien sûr d'un exemple)
Girl: So, don't you want to know who I am?
Narrator: I'm afraid I'm not good at riddles and I'd like to rest, you see.
Girl: Why do you think I've chosen this carriage? We have to talk! I've seen you looking at me.
Narrator : Only because I find your outfit rather eccentric − it's nothing personal!
Girl: On the contrary, it's very personal!
Narrator: I don't know what you mean…
Girl: Well, a long time ago, you met a woman and had an affair with her but then, you simply got rid of her. You were at a Christmas party, she was wearing a long dark green dress for the occasion and you let her down that night. Don't you think I look very much like her? May I call you Daddy?