Sujet inédit, séries technologiques, LV1

Énoncé

Document A
« I asked my mother yesterday how much freedom she had as a child.
"Well," she replied, "I walked to my nursery school in Cambridge alone, aged three, and by four I was roaming the fields behind my house." After that, she explained, came the war(1).
"Your grandfather was away and your grandmother was organising the Women's Voluntary Service; no one knew where the four children were. We spent our afternoons canoeing down the Cam without life-jackets, eating sausages out of tins and, when it rained, we slipped into the cinema to watch unsuitable love stories. No one worried about us, they had more important issues on their minds." Her childhood sounded idyllic. My mother explained that it wasn't always perfect. She had once been accosted by a man while bicycling to her friend's. "I managed to get away. I carried on cycling to my friend's house and ate my tea; it never occurred to me to say anything until I went home. The police were called but I was back on my bike the next day."
My mother took a similar attitude to my childhood. My younger sister and I were allowed to take the Tube home from school across London from the age of five. My sister was hit by a car once when she crossed a busy road to a sweet shop. She broke her leg but, as soon as it had mended we were walking home alone again. My brothers took the train to my grandmother's in Suffolk on their own from the age of six and spent all day without adults in the park playing football.
Now, according to the Good Childhood Inquiry, children have everything – iPods, computer games and designer clothes – except the freedom to play outside on their own. Two thirds of 10-year-olds have never been to a shop or the park by themselves.
Fewer than one in ten eight-year-olds walk to school alone.
I'm just as neurotic as other parents. I walk my three-, four- and six-year-olds to school every day, clutching their hands. Their every moment in London is supervised, with playdates and trips to museums. I drive them to football and tennis. No wonder they love going to the country where they can spend all day making camps in the garden, pretending to be orphans. It isn't just because I fear they may be abducted or run over, it's because I'm also worried about being seen as a bad parent. When I let my eldest son go to the loo(2) on his own on a train, less than 20 feet from where I was seated, the guard lectured me on my irresponsibility. When we go to the park there are signs in the playground saying that parents may be prosecuted if they leave their children unsupervised, and at the swimming pool there must be an adult for every two children.
It is insane. My children still end up in the A&E(3) department as often as we did. The inside of a house can be more dangerous than the street, and sitting at a computer all day, eating crisps, carries more long-term risks than skateboarding alone to a park. »
Telegraph.co.uk, June 2007

Document B
« A Dutch clinic that has begun offering the world's first treatment for computer game addicts has been overwhelmed with pleas for help from parents and children all over the world.
"It's amazing, I've never seen anything like it," said Keith Bakker, the American director of the clinic in Amsterdam. "The phone has been ringing constantly. Computer game addiction is obviously an even greater problem than we imagined."
The clinic will begin treating two teenagers from Britain this week and other sufferers are being signed in from America and Asia.
"These are perfectly decent kids whose lives have been taken over by an addiction," said Bakker, a former drug addict.
Although experts are still debating whether excessive game playing counts as an addiction, Bakker has no doubt that the symptoms are the same. "It's not a chemical dependency, but it's got everything of an obsessive compulsive disorder and all of the other stuff that comes with chemical dependency."
Tim, a 21-year-old from Utrecht, said he had hardly left his bedroom for five years because he was so obsessed by his computer games. "My room was a mess," he said. "Curtains drawn, pizza boxes, empty bottles and junk food wrappers everywhere." His parents were frightened of him because, weighing more than 21 stone(4), he was too strong for them to confront. Eventually they threatened to kick him out unless he enrolled for a month of therapy.
Many adolescent addicts have stopped maturing because of their addiction, claims Bakker. "I've met 19-year-olds with the emotional intelligence of 10-year-olds," he said, "because when they were 10 a parent said `Here, have this Game Boy,' and they haven't stopped playing ever since."
South Korea and China, where people are particularly passionate about computer games, are discussing with manufacturers ways of discouraging compulsive behaviour.
Bakker thinks that European and American distributors should issue warnings about the dangers. »
The Sunday Times, July 23rd, 2006

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 Write down the correct answer.
a) This text is from:
[] a magazine
[] an internet site
[] a diary
b) The main subject is:
[] childhood memories
[] the evolution of man
[] the evolution of parenting
c) How many generations are mentioned?
[] two
[] three
[] four
d) The text is set in:
[] England
[] Ireland
[] Wales
2 The following statements are right. Justify by quoting from the text.
a) The writer's mother did not grow up in London.
b) The writer's mother grew up in troubled times.
c) The writer's mother had several brothers and sisters.
d) The writer grew up in a city.
3 Right or Wrong? Answer and justify by quoting the text.
a) The writer's mother always told her parents where she was.
b) After the writer's sister's accident, her parents were more careful.
c) The writer's children are keen on playing without adults.
d) The writer is afraid of what other people think.
e) Children nowadays have fewer accidents.
f) Staying at home may be bad for your health too.
4 Quote the sentence from the text that gives two LEGAL rules concerning parents' obligations today.
5 Who or what do the following pronouns refer to?
a) "…no one worried about us…"
b) "She broke her leg…"
c) "… they can spend all day…"
d) "…if they leave their children…"
e) "…as often as we did."
6 In the text find the synonyms for:
a) problems
b) repaired
c) holding tightly
d) short journeys
e) kidnapped
f) reprimanded
7 Write down the correct answer.
a) "Your grandfather was away…" means:
[] he was a soldier.
[] he emigrated.
[] he died.
b) "…unsuitable love stories." means:
[] films that they didn't really like.
[] films that they were not allowed to see.
[] films that made them laugh.
c) "it never occurred to me to say anything…" means:
[] I never had the opportunity to say anything.
[] I was never allowed to say anything.
[] I never thought of saying anything.
d) "I'm just as neurotic as other parents." means:
[] I look after my children as well as other parents.
[] I worry a lot about my children, like other parents.
[] I spend a lot of time with my children, like other parents.
Questions on document B
8 This text is an extract from:
  • a web page.
  • a newspaper.
  • a medical journal.
  • a novel.
9 The text deals with people accustomed to:
  • drugs.
  • TV.
  • video games.
  • the Internet.
10 The clinic offering help is located in:
  • Great Britain.
  • the Netherlands.
  • Germany.
  • the United States.
11 Right or wrong? Justify your answers by quoting the text.
a) Treatment has been on offer for a long time.
b) This situation is only a European problem.
c) The director of the clinic used to have the same sort of problem.
12 The following statements are right. Pick sentences to justify them. Quote the line.
a) Experts disagree on the nature of the problem.
b) This problem can lead to obesity.
c) This problem prevents teenagers from growing up normally.
13 Write down 3 adjectives which best describe the players.
  • talkative
  • solitary
  • disturbed
  • healthy
  • anti-social
  • cooperative
14 Find the equivalent words or expressions in the text.
  • young people between the ages of 13 and 19
  • have stopped doing something
  • scared
  • menaced
  • signed up
  • to publish
15 From the following list, write down the four adjectives which best describe the parents' attitude.
  • indifferent
  • fed up
  • irresponsible
  • helpless
  • afraid
  • understanding
  • anxious
  • dependent
Question on documents A and B
16 Both documents deal with the idea of progress. Find two similarities and two differences in the ideas expressed in these two documents.
II. Expression écrite
Vous traiterez les deux sujets.
1 Imagine a conversation between the writer of Document A and her daughter who wants to go to school alone. (120 words)
2 A parents' association writes an article about the dangers of computer games and offers advice. (120 words)
(1) the war: World War II.
(2) the loo: the toilet.
(3) A&E: les urgences.
(4) 21 stone  = 133 kg.

Le sujet pas à pas

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande :
a) d'identifier la source du document : magazine/ site internet/ journal intime
b) d'identifier le thème : mémoires d'enfance/ l'évolution de l'homme/ l'évolution du rôle des parents
c) d'indiquer le nombre de générations qui sont mentionnées : 2/ 3/ 4
d) d'indiquer le cadre : Angleterre/ Irlande/ Pays de Galles
2 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de trouver la citation dans le texte qui prouve que chaque affirmation est vraie.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
grow up  = grandir, passer son enfance
3 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit cette fois de décider si chaque affirmation est vraie ou fausse et de trouver la citation dans le texte qui le prouve.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Moins =  less  + Nom singulier ; fewer  + Nom pluriel
Procéder par étapes
  1. Repérez la phrase dans le texte qui évoque la même idée que l'affirmation. (Elles sont présentées dans l'ordre du texte.)
  2. Analysez si l'affirmation et la phrase du texte disent la même chose ou non.
  3. Formulez votre réponse (Right ou Wrong), et citez la phrase que vous avez sélectionnée.
4 
Comprendre la question
Vous devez retrouver dans le texte la phrase qui indique les deux règles juridiques au sujet des obligations parentales aujourd'hui.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Take legal action against = prosecute (poursuivre)
5 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande d'indiquer à qui ou à quoi renvoie chaque pronom en italiques.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Sujet
Complément
I
me
you
you
he
him
she
her
it
it
we
us
they
them

L'élément auquel correspond le pronom se trouve toujours dans le texte en amont.
6 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de trouver des synonymes pour chaque mot dans le texte. (Ils sont présentés dans l'ordre du texte.)
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Pour tester si vous avez trouvé le bon mot, il faut le remplacer par le synonyme et vérifier que cela fait sens. Cela vous aidera aussi à réfléchir à la fonction grammaticale :
Problems, short journeys  = des noms au pluriel (avec un s)
Repaired, kidnapped, reprimanded  = des verbes au prétérit (V-ed)
Holding tightly  = V-ing
7 
Comprendre la question
Pour chaque citation vous devez décider laquelle des propositions correspond le mieux au niveau du sens. (Il faut remettre la citation dans le contexte de l'histoire et des personnes pour opérer votre choix.)
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Suitable = appropriate
Occur = enter one's head (ici)
Question on document B
8 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande d'identifier la source du document.
9 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande d'identifier le genre d'addiction dont sont victimes les personnes ici. (Attention : ce n'est pas parce que vous trouvez un de ces mots une fois que tout le texte en parle. Il faut passer en revue la totalité du document pour cerner le sujet principal.)
10 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit d'identifier le pays où se trouve la clinique dont on parle.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Le pays peut être identifié par l'emploi d'un adjectif de nationalité.
Great Britain => British
the Netherlands => Dutch
Germany => German
the United States => American
11 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de décider si chaque affirmation est vraie ou fausse et de trouver la citation dans le texte qui le prouve.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Used to  + Verbe : exprime l'habitude dans le passé.
L'adjectif 'former' signifie `ancien' : il indique qu'autrefois la personne avait ce statut.
12 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de trouver la citation dans le texte qui prouve que chaque affirmation est vraie.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Prevent from = stop  + V-ing
13 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande de sélectionner les 3 adjectifs qui décrivent les joueurs.
Procéder par étapes
  1. Repérez les passages dans le texte où l'on parle des joueurs.
  2. Analysez le sens de chaque passage et choisissez l'adjectif qui correspond le mieux.
14 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de trouver des synonymes pour chaque mot ou expression dans le texte. (Ils sont présentés dans l'ordre du texte.)
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Menaced et signed up sont des verbes au prétérit (V-ed).
Scared peut être un verbe au prétérit ou bien un adjectif.
Publish est un verbe à l'infinitif.
15 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande de sélectionner les 4 adjectifs qui décrivent l'attitude des parents. (Ils correspondent à deux sentiments – 2 adjectifs par sentiment – indiqués dans le texte.)
Question on documents A and B
16 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit d'expliquer deux similitudes et deux différences dans l'approche de l'idée de progrès dans les deux documents. Pensez aux idées générales plutôt qu'aux détails. De qui parle-t-on ? Qu'ont-ils en commun ? Qu'est-ce qui les différencie ? Cette vision du progrès, dans les deux cas, est-elle optimiste ou pessimiste ?
II. Expression personnelle
1 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de rédiger une conversation entre la journaliste et sa fille qui veut se rendre à l'école seule.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Une conversation nécessite l'utilisation de l'anglais oral :
Formes contractées (it's/ don't…)
Impératif (tell me…/ don't worry)
Formules idiomatiques :
  • I swear (= I promise)
  • I'm afraid (= I'm sorry)
Chaque personnage joue un rôle précis dans la conversation :
pour la fille, elle espère convaincre sa mère :
  • I wish I could…/ Please let me  + Verbe…
  • all my friends…
pour la journaliste, elle doit trouver des arguments solides :
  • too much traffic
  • dangerous drivers
  • too many strangers
Procéder par étapes
  1. Réfléchissez aux grandes lignes de la conversation.
  2. Rédigez la conversation au brouillon.
  3. Contrôlez la précision linguistique de votre brouillon (grammaire, lexique) puis recopiez-le au propre.
2 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de rédiger un article sur les dangers des jeux vidéo à l'intention de parents.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Il vous faudra exprimer :
La raison : that's why/ as a consequence/ as a result
L'obligation : have to + Verbe ; must + Verbe
Le lexique de la surveillance : keep an eye on/ watch/ be aware/ be careful, warn, inform
La conséquence : lead to/ result in/ bring about/ cause
La probabilité : may/ might/ could + Verbe, be likely to/ will probably + Verbe
Procéder par étapes
  1. Faites un plan cohérent.
  2. Rédigez l'article au brouillon.
  3. Contrôlez sa précision linguistique.

Corrigé

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 
a) This text is from an internet site.
b) The main subject is the evolution of parenting.
c)  Four generations are mentioned.
d) The text is set in England.
2 
a) "I walked to my nursery school in Cambridge […]"
"We spent our afternoons canoeing down the Cam […]"
b) "After that, she explained, came the war."
c) "[…] no one knew where the four children were."
d) "My younger sister and I were allowed to take the Tube home from school across London […]"
3 
a) Wrong: "[…] no one knew where the four children were."
b) Wrong: "[…] as soon as it had mended we were walking home alone again."
c) Right: "[…] they can spend all day […] pretending to be orphans."
d) Right: "I'm also worried about being seen as a bad parent."
e) Wrong: "My children still end up in the A&E department as often as we did."
f) Right: "The inside of a house can be more dangerous than the street" "[…] sitting at a computer all day, eating crisps, carries more long-term risks than skateboarding alone to a park."
4 "When we go to the park there are signs in the playground saying that parents may be prosecuted if they leave their children unsupervised, and at the swimming pool there must be an adult for every two children."
5 
a) "…No one worried about us […]": The writer's mother and her brothers and sisters.
b) "She broke her leg […]": the writer's sister.
c) "[…] they can spend all day […]": the writer's children.
d) "[…] if they leave their children […]": parents (like the writer).
e) "[…] as often as we did […]": the writer's generation (people about the same age as the writer).
6 
a) problems: "issues"
b) repaired: "mended"
c) holding tightly: "clutching"
d) short journeys: "trips"
e) kidnapped: "abducted"
f) reprimanded: "lectured"
7 
a) "Your grandfather was away […]" means he was a soldier.
b) "[…] unsuitable love stories […]" means films that they were not allowed to see.
c) "it never occurred to me saying anything […]" means I never thought of saying anything.
d) "I'm just as neurotic as other parents" means I worry a lot about my children, like other parents.
Questions on document B
8 This text is an extract from a newspaper.
9 The text deals with people accustomed to video games.
10 The clinic offering help is located in the Netherlands.
11 
a) Wrong: "has begun offering the world's first treatment […]"
b) Wrong: "all over the world." - "from Britain […] from America and Asia."
c) Right: "a former drug addict."
12 
a) "Although experts are still debating whether excessive game playing counts as an addiction.[…]"
b) "[…] weighing more than 21 stone […]"
c) "Many adolescent addicts have stopped maturing because of their addiction […]"
13 
  • solitary
  • disturbed
  • anti-social
14 
  • "teenagers"
  • "have given up"
  • "frightened"
  • "threatened"
  • "enrolled"
  • "issue"
15 
  • fed up
  • helpless
  • afraid
  • anxious
Question on documents A and B
16 Both documents show that progress represents a danger for young people. However, in Document A the danger is outside the home, whereas in Document B the video games played by the addicts are in the home. In both cases, the danger is more pronounced if parents are not present to guide children. The addiction to video games seems much more dangerous that the lack of liberty for children, as it is easier to find a solution.
II. Expression écrite
1 Daughter Mum: – I'd like to go to school on my own, I'm old enough now.
Mother: – I'm afraid I won't let you go to school alone. We live in a big city, the streets are dangerous places. I think you're too young for the moment.
Daughter: – But Mum, I've lots of friends who go to school on their own.
Mother: – Well, I know, but they live closer to school than you do. However I really think their parents are too permissive considering the age of their children.
Daughter: – But Mum, I swear I will be very careful.
Mother: – You're definitely too young, the streets are full of dangers, the traffic is too heavy and drivers are not cautious enough and there are dangerous people as well. I'll let you go to school on your own when you are older.
2 Computer games are dangerous for your children.
Many teenagers play video games, an activity which is dangerous for them, that's why parents have to be cautious and must keep an eye on the behaviour and reactions of their children.
Quite often, playing video games becomes a real problem for teenagers and it may lead to a real addiction. It can be compared to drug addiction. There are signs which can be noticed and must be taken into account so as to react as quickly as possible.
If you notice the following signs, they are likely to become addicted.
They stay in their room and play video games hours on end. They also lose their friends and don't speak a lot with their parents or even do not communicate with them any longer. They eat junk food so as to save time for their favourite activity. They may even give up school.
Not only do many teenagers suffer from this addiction but young children may also become addicted. Eventually, they may even stop maturing.
Consequently parents must be aware of these signs and be very cautious. To avoid that kind of problem, the first thing to do is to have the computer in a common room and not in the teenager's room which will help parents to keep an eye on the time spent playing video games.
Parents must insist on their children having meals with them and grasp that opportunity to communicate as much as possible with their children. They must also talk with them about video games and warn them not to spend too much time playing those games.
Unfortunately, if it is too late, parents may consult a Dutch clinic which offers treatment for that kind of problem.