Sujet inédit, séries technologiques, LV2

Énoncé

Document A
« I found our station wagon in the line of cars. Robert had already gotten in the backseat with Albert so I could have the front.
Robert resumed the conversation he'd been having with my mother.
Then abruptly, Robert stopped talking.
My mother didn't seem to notice: she was driving even more slowly than usual, looking in the windows of a house, which she said gave her ideas about decorating.
When I turned around, Robert was staring at me.
"What?" I said.
He shook his head.
At home he went upstairs without taking his jacket off. He was waiting for me in my room when I got there, and he closed the door after me.
"I know," he said.
When I breathed in, my chest was icy. I said, "Know what?"
"I know you've been smoking," he said. "I smelled it in the car."
I tasted the cigarette on my breath. "I was just trying it."
"Don't lie to me," he said. "This is a matter of life and – "I thought he was going to say "breath," like the TV commercial against smoking, but he said "death." His face was as grave as it had been at our grandfather's funeral.
He asked how much I smoked and with whom and where, and I told him.
When I said Margie's name, he nodded, and to himself he added, "From Girl Scouts." Robert remembered everything I ever told him.
After I answered his questions, I told him about Margie robbing the gift shop and getting expelled; I repeated what she'd said about her parents getting divorced and Miss King living at their house. It was a relief to tell him, even though he was just my little brother.
"Well," he said, sounding like the sheriff in a western. "I don't think you'll be spending much time with Margie Muchnick anymore." Then he said, "Where do you keep your cigarettes?"
I opened the bottom drawer of my desk, and Robert took the pack of cigarettes Margie had given to me.
I said "Are you going to tell Mom and Dad?"
He said, "I will have to." He said he would do anything to get me to stop smoking. "I will make your life miserable," he said, and I knew that he would. »
Melissa Bank, The Wonder Spot, 2005

Document B
«  The narrator is the mother of the family.
Everyone's behaviour has altered for the worse.
At school, Jordan has been lashing out at other kids, even the bigger ones. He punched and kicked Debbie Suffling who, though tall and strong-looking, actually has a blood condition that means she must not be hit.
Julie Edmunds, his teacher, sent Jordan straight to the head's office where he sat stony-eyed and sullen and refusing to say sorry. That's what Julie tells us when we go in to see her – that it's not the incident itself but his total lack of remorse about it that she takes most seriously.
I'm sure he's sorry, Mick tells her. He's just too proud to say it.
We don't encourage that sort of pride in this school, Julie says. We try to encourage children to respect others and put the truth first.
And she eyes Liv's buggy and I know what she's thinking: what's she doing with another baby at her age when she can't even control the ones she's already got?
But it's not just Jordan. Rosa, who's loud and difficult at home but normally an angel at school – so good and conscientious that she will literally sweat if she doesn't get her homework done on time – has lost her pen, her PE kit and half of her books, and been in trouble more than once for talking in assembly.
Our Rosa? Mick says. Talking in assembly?
Not only that, but her shoelaces are fraying, her shirt's perpetually splattered with ink, her fingers are grubby and her arms covered in strange itchy spots which she picks till they bleed.
Who's throwing ink at you, Rosa? I ask her. Someone's flicking it at you, aren't they?
It's my cartridge, she says flatly. It leaks.
All over your back?
She makes an ugly face at me.
And the spots – I wonder if they're flea bites. We must get Maria a flea collar, I say.
It's not Maria, Rosa almost shouts. Maria's fine. You leave my kitten out of this! »
Julie Myerson, Something Might Happen, 2003

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 Complete this summary with words from the text (one blank is one word).
A ...... (1) is ...... (2) her two sons ...... (3).
Robert, who is the narrator's ...... (4) discovers that the narrator ...... (5) with his school friend named ...... (6).
At home Robert wants his brother to tell him where he ...... (7) his cigarettes and threatens him ...... (8) the truth to their parents.
2 Right or wrong?
Justify your answer by quoting from the text.
a) The woman was not paying attention to her children's conversation.
b) Robert followed the narrator into his bedroom.
c) He knew that the narrator had smoked because he had seen him.
d) Robert wants to know all the details about the narrator's habit.
e) Robert is older than the narrator.
f) The narrator's cigarettes were hidden under his bed.
g) The narrator hadn't bought the cigarettes himself.
3 The following statements are true. Justify them by quoting the text.
a) Robert does not want to carry on with their conversation.
b) The narrator had just smoked a cigarette.
c) Robert thought smoking was a very serious problem.
d) Margie had already been in trouble.
e) The narrator feels better after telling Robert about Margie.
f) Robert is authoritarian.
g) Robert is determined to make things difficult for the narrator.
Questions on document B
4 
a) There are five characters in the family circle.
JClassify them into two age groups and give a name to each age group.
b) What is Maria's relationship with the family?
5 "Our Rosa? Mick says." Who does "Our" refer to ?
Focus on the passage from "Everyone's behaviour has […]" down to "[…] she's already got"
6 
a) Where did "the incident" take place? (10 words maximum)
b) Give the names of the two characters (one boy and one girl) who took part in "the incident".
7 
a) Among the following list, choose the two adjectives that best apply to the boy after "the incident".
ashamed - guilty - heartless - sympathetic - uncooperative - worried
b) Justify your answer with one quotation for each adjective.
c) "I'm sure, he's sorry, Mick tells her." Who do the underlined pronouns refer to?
d) What did Mick try to do then? (10-15 words)
Focus on the passage from "But it's not just Jordan […]" down to the end.
8 Say whether these statements are right or wrong.
Justify your answers by quoting from the text.
a) Rosa behaves well at home. (one quotation)
b) Rosa's attitude at school has become positive. (one quotation)
c) Rosa's physical appearance is worrying. (two quotations)
d) The relationship between Rosa and the narrator is tense. (one quotation)
Question on documents A and B
9 Choose the one theme in the following list which is the most appropriate for both document A and document B.
Explain your choice briefly.
a) Family tensions.
b) Children rule the household.
c) Keeping an eye on children's behavior.
d) Hiding from the parents.
II. Expression écrite
Choose one subject. (200 words)
1 Imagine what happens after the conversation between Robert and the narrator in document A.
2 Smoking is banned in public places in France. What is your opinion?

Le sujet pas à pas

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de compléter le résumé à l'aide de mots du texte. (Chaque blanc correspond à un mot.)
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Vous devez vous servir des éléments dans chaque phrase pour analyser la nature et la fonction des mots manquants.
Pour la première phrase, « her two sons » vous indique que le mot manquant en 1) est un nom commun qui désigne la mère des deux garçons.
2) Il s'agit d'un verbe en -ing. (Seule possibilité après « is » ….)
3) Cela ne peut être qu'un complément d'information par rapport aux éléments déjà identifiés. Le sujet, verbe et complément direct sont déjà connus.
4) L'élément manquant correspond au lien de parenté entre Robert et le narrateur. Qui est Robert pour le narrateur ?
5) Il s'agit d'un verbe qui explicite ce que le narrateur fait avec son camarade d'école.
6) « named » vous indique que c'est le nom de ce camarade qui fait défaut.
7) La présence du sujet (« he ») et du complément (« his cigarettes ») vous indique que c'est le verbe qui manque. Que veut savoir son frère ?
8) Après « to », c'est un verbe qu'il faut. Que Robert menace-t-il de faire ?
2 
Comprendre la question
Pour chaque affirmation, vous devez indiquer si elle est vraie ou fausse et le justifier en citant le texte.
a) La femme ne prêtait pas attention à la conversation des enfants.
b) Robert a suivi le narrateur dans sa chambre.
c) Il savait que le narrateur fumait parce qu'il l'avait vu.
d) Robert veut connaître tous les détails de cette habitude qu'a prise le narrateur.
e) Robert est plus âgé que le narrateur.
f) Les cigarettes du narrateur étaient cachées sous son lit.
g) Le narrateur n'avait pas acheté les cigarettes lui-même.
3 
Comprendre la question
Chaque affirmation est correcte. Vous devez citer la phrase qui le prouve à chaque fois.
a) Robert ne veut pas poursuivre leur conversation.
b) Le narrateur venait de fumer une cigarette.
c) Robert pensait que fumer était grave.
d) Margie avait déjà eu des ennuis.
e) Le narrateur se sent mieux après avoir parlé de Margie avec Robert.
f) Robert est autoritaire.
g) Robert est déterminé à rendre les choses difficiles pour le narrateur.
Questions on document B
4 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande :
a) de classer les cinq personnages qui font partie de la famille en deux groupes en fonction de leur âge.
b) d'expliquer le rapport entre Maria et la famille. Qui est Maria ?
5 
Comprendre la question
Vous devez expliquer à qui renvoie « our ».
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Rappelez-vous des pronoms et des adjectifs possessifs.
Pronom
Adjectif possessif
I
my
you
your
he
his
she
her
it
its
we
our
they
their

« Our » signifie que Mick s'associe à quelqu'un d'autre. Qui?
Focus on the passage from "Everyone's behaviour has […]" down to "[…] she's already got"
6 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit :
a) d'expliquer où l'incident s'est produit.
b) de nommer les deux personnages (une fille et un garçon) qui ont pris part à l'incident.
7 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande :
a) de choisir les deux adjectifs dans la liste qui correspondent le mieux au garçon après l'incident.
b) de proposer une citation par adjectif en justification.
c) d'indiquer à qui renvoient les pronoms soulignés dans la citation.
d) d'expliquer ce que Mick a essayé de faire ensuite.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
ashamed = regretful
guilty \neq innocent
heartless = cruel
sympathetic = full of compassion
uncooperative \neq helpful
worried = anxious
Focus on the passage from "But it's not just Jordan […]" down to the end.
8 
Comprendre la question
Pour chaque affirmation, vous devez indiquer si elle est vraie ou fausse et le justifier en citant le texte. (On vous indique le nombre de citations attendu chaque fois.)
a) Rosa se comporte bien à la maison.
b) Son attitude à l'école est devenue positive.
c) Son apparence physique est inquiétante.
d) La relation entre Rosa et le narrateur est tendue.
Question on documents A and B
9 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de choisir la thématique parmi les quatre proposées qui vous semble la plus appropriée pour les deux documents. Vous devez expliquer votre choix brièvement.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
(to) rule = govern
household = home
(to) keep an eye on = observe/ control
II. Expression écrite
1 
Comprendre la question
On vous demande d'imaginer la suite de l'histoire dans le document A. Que se passe-t-il à l'issue de l'échange entre Robert et le narrateur ? Autrement dit, on vous invite à continuer le récit.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Le récit dans le document A est au prétérit, avec la conversation au discours direct (entre guillemets). Vous pouvez continuer de la sorte, ou bien recourir au discours indirect pour varier.
Verbes d'introduction pour le discours indirect :
  • tell (+ Complément personnel)
  • explain/ protest/ confess
  • ask  + Complément +  to  + Verbe
  • tell somebody off = reprimand
Le discours direct dans un récit au prétérit nécessite un glissement des temps et d'autres modifications :
  • She said « I'm angry » => She said (that) she was angry.
  • She shouted « I'll tell your father. » => She shouted that she would tell my father.
Procéder par étapes
  1. Réfléchissez à l'évolution de la situation et aux grandes lignes de la suite de l'histoire.
  2. Rédigez le récit au brouillon en évitant trop de prise de risque.
  3. Contrôlez la précision linguistique de votre brouillon (grammaire, lexique) puis recopiez-le au propre.
2 
Comprendre la question
Il s'agit de prendre position par rapport à l'interdiction de fumer dans les lieux publics en France et d'exprimer son point de vue. Est-ce une bonne politique ? Si « oui », y a-t-il des limites ? Si « non », quelles sont les raisons? Quelle que soit la position que vous adoptiez, il s'agit d'un essai argumentatif.
Ce qui importe le plus, c'est que vous démontriez votre capacité à argumenter.
Vous pouvez fort bien présenter les deux faces du même argument et annoncer votre position personnelle dans la conclusion.
Mobiliser ses connaissances
Pour un essai argumentatif, il faut mobiliser :
Les expressions d'opinion : to my mind/ in my opinion/ from my point of view/ as far as I'm concerned
Les mots de liaison pour articuler votre discours : en renforcement : indeed/ moreover/ what's more ; pour marquer une opposition : however/ and yet
Les effets néfastes de la fumée :damage health, inhale smoke, danger for passive smokers, cough (tousser)
Procéder par étapes
1. Préparez vos idées : des arguments pour et contre.
2. Rédigez votre réponse en respectant la structure d'un essai argumentatif :
  • introduction (reformulation du sujet.)
  • 1er paragraphe = « thèse »
  • 2e paragraphe = « antithèse »
  • conclusion (rappel du sujet et votre avis personnel circonstancié)
3. Contrôlez la qualité de votre anglais.

Corrigé

I. Compréhension de l'écrit
Questions on document A
1 A mother (1) is driving (2) her two sons home (3). Robert, who is the narrator's brother (4) discovers that the narrator smokes (5) with his school friend named Margie Muchnick (6). At home Robert wants his brother to tell him where he keeps (7) his cigarettes and threatens to tell (8) the truth to their parents.
2 
a) Right: "My mother didn't seem to notice …"
b) Wrong: "He was waiting for me in my room …"
c) Wrong "I smelled it in the car."
d) Right: "He asked me how much I smoked and with whom and where …"
e) Wrong: "…he was just my little brother."
f) Wrong: "I opened the bottom drawer of my desk …"
g) Right: "…the pack of cigarettes Margie had given to me."
3 
a) "Then abruptly, Robert stopped talking"
b) "I tasted the cigarette on my breath."
c) "This is a matter of life and – … death."
d) "…I told about Margie robbing the gift shop and getting expelled…"
e) "It was a relief to tell him…"
f) "…sounding like a sheriff in a western."
g) "I will make your life miserable…"
Questions on document B
4 
a) the parents = the mother/ narrator + Mick the children = Jordan ; Liv, Rosa
b) Maria is Rosa's kitten
5 
a)  "Our" refers to the parents, Mick and the mother who is the narrator.
6 
a) The incident took place at school.
b) Jordan and Debbie took part in the incident.
7 
a) The boy is heartless and uncooperative.
b) Heartless: "[…] his total lack of remorse […]"
Uncooperative: "[…] where he sat stony-eyed and sullen and refusing to say sorry."
- "He's just too proud to say it."
c)  "I" refers to Mick.
"He" refers to Jordan.
"Her" refers to Jordan's teacher, Julie Edmunds.
d) Mick tries to make Jordan's teacher, Julie Edmunds, understand that even if Jordan doesn't say a word, he is in fact sorry for what he did.
8 
a) Wrong: "Rosa, who is loud and difficult at home […]"
b) Wrong: "[…] been in trouble more than once for talking in assembly."
c) Right: "[…] her shoelaces are fraying, her shirt's perpetually splattered with ink, her fingers are grubby and her arms covered in strange itchy spots which she picks till they bleed."
d) Right: "[…] she says flatly." - "She makes an ugly face at me." - "[…] Rosa almost shouts."
Question on documents A and B
9 
c) Keeping an eye on children's behavior
In document A, the parents are anxious about their children's attitude at home and at school. In document B, Robert is concerned about his little brother's behavior with regards smoking.
II. Expression écrite
1 He left the room and went downstairs. The first thing he did was to tell my mother he had found out I smoked and he gave her the pack of cigarettes he had taken in my drawer. No sooner had he done so than I heard a voice from downstairs, it was my mother calling me and asking me to come immediately. I knew it was going to be a hard time for me.
Showing me the pack of cigarettes Robert had just given her, she asked me to explain why I had this pack and where I had bought it. I explained my friend Margie had given me the cigarettes but I pretended I hadn't smoken any of them.
Robert who was present protested and said I had confessed to him that I had smoked and he added that he had smelled it when I got into the car.
So my mother didn't believe me, she was distrustful. She asked me to breathe to check if she could smell it as my brother did and she did.
She told me off for lying and smoking and reminded me that I was too young to smoke and that it was very harmful to my health.
She sent me to my room and said she would talk about it with my father in the evening.
2 Needless to say that everybody knows smoking can damage people's health that's why I think it is a good thing that smoking is now banned from public places. Smoking is a personal choice but the people who smoke mustn't impose their smoking on non-smokers which is what happens since you can't help but inhale other people's smoke if you are in the same place as them when they smoke.
It is difficult to understand why it has taken such a long time for authorities to ban smoking in public places as it's been known for quite a long time that smoking is dangerous even as a passive smoker.
Being in premises full of smoke was not pleasant at all for non-smokers whether it was in a bar or café or at the restaurant. The smell is not pleasant and smoke makes people cough.
Moreover it was all the more dangerous for people who suffer from asthma or allergies. The freedom of people was not really taken into consideration. Those who smoke felt free to smoke wherever they were but the non-smokers had no choice but to accept that fact but, as far as they were concerned, their freedom was not respected.